I had a choir concert last weekend. Two, actually, and two dress rehearsals. It was fun, especially watching Jake pirouette. Maybe you had to be there for that. 

The really exciting thing about last weekend, though, was that I came home from the Sunday matinee to a box of books. Books are always exciting for me, but these sent me over the moon because they were mine. Not just mine in that I own them, but mine in that I wrote them. It was a box of five Shark Must Park! paperback books.

I drove back to the church where we perform in an effort to catch some of my choir friends to tell because my SQUEEs needed a broader audience than my family. A few people were still there and were gracious enough to indulge my happy dance.

It’s a week later and I’m sitting in the SCCA waiting for a skin cancer specialist to check out my arm, but I’m still walking on a bit of air. Probably helps that some more of my author’s copies of Shark Must Park! arrived yesterday. I was already out because I only had a few to begin with and I’d been carrying those around giving them to people.

I keep trying to describe the book to people and online, but all I can come up with is that it’s about a shark trying to park and he can’t find a space. There’s so much more to it, but I couldn’t find the words, so frustrating because that’s supposed to be my thing, except that it’s not. At all. Fiction I’m good with, but trying to write any sort of sales copy, even for something I believe in, just feels awkward and clunky. Even adding that it’s about kindness because he gives up the space he does find to someone who needs it more feels awkward.

Then I gave one to our occupational therapist just before the boys’ back-to-back appointments. She read it with both boys at their request. It was the first time for both of them and they loved it, which felt amazing to hear. More than that, the OT talked about all the emotional regulation concepts in it.

One of the characters has Rock Brain, another is Glassman, and another is Mean Gene. Shark also handles the transitions from one disappointing situation to another without melting down and he remains flexible through it all. Funny how flexibility, transitions, and emotional regulation wound their way into my work without my being consciously aware of it; almost as if I’ve been working on them in my own life so much that I’ve integrated them and no longer take notice of them.

One of the characters has Rock Brain, another is Glassman, and another is Mean Gene. Shark also handles the transitions from one disappointing situation to another without melting down and he remains flexible through it all. Funny how flexibility, transitions, and emotional regulation wound their way into my work without my being consciously aware of it; almost as if I’ve been working on them in my own life so much that I’ve integrated them and no longer take notice of them. 

She also mentioned the kindness he shows in the end, the only part I already knew. Also the aspect that is noticeably absent in the larger society these days, which is part of the reason I purposefully included it so that it would stand out in the book.

So, thank you, fabulous OT, for adding some concepts to my description.

P.S. I had two reviews on Amazon, but they just removed one of them. I would greatly appreciate any honest reviews. I know it takes time that’s already short to do, so thank you in advance for your effort.


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